The Surroundings &
Places of Interest

Monkey Forest Ubud

Mandala Suci Wenara Wana, or well known as Ubud Monkey Forest, is the sanctuary and natural habitat of the Balinese long-tailed Monkey, scientific name Macaca fascicularis. It is located at Padangtegal Ubud, Bali.

About 1049 monkeys live in this sanctuary. They are divided into 6 groups, namely in front of main temple group, forest conservation group, central point group, eastern group, Michelin group, and cemeteries group. We also divide the monkeys by age: 63 adult male, 34 Sub-adult male, 219 Adult female, 29 Sub-adult female, 167 juveniles 1 (2-3 year), 118 juveniles 2 (1-2 year), 63 Infant old (5-12 month) and 56 infant.

Sacred Monkey Forest Ubud is a famous tourist attraction in Ubud. In every month around 10.000 – 15.000 visitors come to Monkey Forest Ubud. The Monkey Forest Ubud has 186 species of plants and trees in 12,5 hectares of forest. The Monkey Forest Ubud has 3 temples, namely Dalem Agung Padangtegal Temple, Holy Spring Temple and Prajapati Temple.

The forest is owned by the Padangtegal community and is managed by Mandala Suci Wenara Wana Management. The purpose of the management is to keep sacred the place and promote the Monkey Forest Ubud as an international tourist destination.

Elephant Cave

Goa Gajah, also known as the “Elephant Cave”, located east of Peliatan, close to Ubud, in the center of the island of Bali. The cave Goa Gajah dates back to the 11th century and was discovered in 1922. The entrance to the cave is a relief of dangerous creatures and demons with wide open, threatening mouth. They thought it suggested an elephants mouth. Hence the name Elephant Cave. Others claim that the gaping mouth is the entrance to the Hindu God of the earth Bhoma, while others say that the mouth is part of the child-eating witch Rangda in Balinese mythology.

The leading theory suggests that Goa Gajah was used as a hermitage or shrine by Hindu priests, who had dug the cave entirely by hand. Although it is recognized as a Hindu shrine, a number of relics and the vicinity of a Buddhist temple, suggests that this place has a special meaning for early Buddhists had on Bali.

Tegalalang Ricefield

Tegalalang Rice Terrace is one of Bali’s most famous tourist attractions. Located north of Ubud at 600m above sea level the air is cool, however down in the valley it gets really hot and humid. From the top of the road, you get stunning panoramic views of the terraces, which is an irrigation system called Subak dating back to the 8th century.

The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the far side of the valley. The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it’s a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

Taman Saraswati Temple

Tegalalang Rice Terrace is one of Bali’s most famous tourist attractions. Located north of Ubud at 600m above sea level the air is cool, however down in the valley it gets really hot and humid. From the top of the road, you get stunning panoramic views of the terraces, which is an irrigation system called Subak dating back to the 8th century.

The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the far side of the valley. The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it’s a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

Ubud Market

Tegalalang Rice Terrace is one of Bali’s most famous tourist attractions. Located north of Ubud at 600m above sea level the air is cool, however down in the valley it gets really hot and humid. From the top of the road, you get stunning panoramic views of the terraces, which is an irrigation system called Subak dating back to the 8th century.

The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the far side of the valley. The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it’s a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

Campuhan Ridge Walk

Tegalalang Rice Terrace is one of Bali’s most famous tourist attractions. Located north of Ubud at 600m above sea level the air is cool, however down in the valley it gets really hot and humid. From the top of the road, you get stunning panoramic views of the terraces, which is an irrigation system called Subak dating back to the 8th century.

The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the far side of the valley. The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it’s a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.